National Astrophysics and Space Science Programme (NASSP)

Seminars

NASSP SEMINARS

2017

Monsters of the Cosmos

Dr. Matt Hilton, University of Kwa-zulu Natal (Westville Campus)

Wednesday, 29 March 2017, Physics Seminar Room (3rd Floor) 
 
Abstract:
The most monstrous objects in the Universe are galaxy clusters, which have masses ranging from 100 – 1000 trillion times that of the Sun. In this talk Dr. Matt will describe the hunt for these massive beasts using X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect surveys, and what follow-up observations at other wavelengths that can tell us about their galaxy populations, the properties of their hot gas atmospheres, and the formation of structure in the Universe.
 
For more information kindly contact hiltonm@ukzn.ac.za

Evidence of Midlatitude Plasma Bubbles during Geomagnetic Storms

Dr. Zama Katamzi Joseph (SANSA – Space Science, Hermanus)
 

Wednesday, 06 September 2017, Physics Seminar Room (3rd Floor)

Time : 10:00 – 11:00
 
Title of the presentation: 
Evidence of Midlatitude Plasma Bubbles during Geomagnetic Storms.
 

For more information kindly contact zkatamzi@sansa.org.za

2018

Seminar by Carolyn Crichton

Speaker: Carolyn Crichton (Technical Grants Manager, HIRAX Project)
 
Date: Thursday, 6 September 2018
 
Venue: Physics Seminar Room (3rd Floor) 
 
Time: 2pm
 
Abstract:
In many ways the 18th century philosophical thought, “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” can be applied to communicating scientific research. If an interesting or significant result is found but no one is able to communicate it, does it really add to the scientific body of knowledge? Effective communication is often one of the most important tools for researchers. Effective communication can be the deciding factor in how research is perceived by both outsiders and colleagues. This perception may impact how seriously the results are taken and will dictate whether the project receives grant money or awards. In this seminar, we will discuss the importance of science communication and how to present research in an interesting and meaningful way.
 
For more information kindly contact carolyn.m.crichton@gmail.com